How To Beat Lens Fogging

Are you tired of battling fogged lenses? Let’s make sure it never happens again!

In this video, I’ll cover why lenses fog and what you can do to prevent it. We’ll look at steps you can take to keep fogging from happening in both hot, humid conditions and when you come inside in the winter. We’ll also look at field-tested tips for clearing a fogged lens quickly when it does happen. Don’t let a fogged lens ruin your next photo outing. This video will show you everything you need to know to make lens fogging a problem of the past!

PS – If you enjoyed this post, I think you’ll REALLY like my e-books and video workshops! Thousands of pages and hours of videos filled with tips, tricks, and techniques – all my best content! Check ’em out – click here (hey, it’s free to look).

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Steve Reid
Steve Reid
3 days ago

I fight that all year round here in Florida. If I’m out on my Airboat I don’t worry about it but if I’m driving to a shooting I keep the air off and windows down a little. I learned this the hard way once when I went for a night shooting of the International Space Station flying between me and the Moon. Great tips, Thanks

Redactle
1 month ago

Because I reside in the South, lens fogging is a continual issue on hot, humid days. So, if I know I’m going out on the estate to photograph my wife’s daylilies, I set my camera on a table outside on our sun porch, which isn’t air-conditioned, so it can warm up. This works very well as long as I remember doing it.

Bruce
Bruce
3 months ago

AC in a car or house work by removing moisture from the air which also helps for fogging. In most places where we stay I avoid using the room AC as much as possible. Ceiling fans help a great deal to cope with warm weather without needing AC for good night’s sleep.

Stephen
Stephen
3 months ago

Astrophotographers often use a USB powered “dew warmer” a.k.a “lens warmer” for the same reason. They cost about $15 to $25 online and are very good at warming a cold lens or keeping one warm. You can find them in various sizes that will accommodate even big lenses since they are made for portable telescopes.

Melanie
Melanie
3 months ago

I have to say my absolutely favorite moment is right after 3 minutes, where your garage looks like ours! Guess the moral of the story is, “you can either clean the garage or take photos”. haha. Living in South Florida, this is a constant battle. The garage is too hot, I think, but luckily, we now have empty bedrooms from children fledging. So, we close the vents in there and I keep my gear in cases in those rooms. Only issue is the children return with the grandchildren and then I have to move all the gear out so they… Read more »

Greg Taylor
Greg Taylor
3 months ago

Since I live in the South lens fogging is a constant problem during hot, high humidity days. So, to deal with this, if I know I’m going out on the estate to photograph my wife’s day lilies, I place my camera on the table outside on our sun porch, which isn’t air conditioned, so it can warm up. This works just fine, as long as I remember to do it.

Mark
Mark
3 months ago

Very timely as I’m headed to Costa Rica shortly. I typically keep my hotel room warmer than most, but sounds like I my need to keep it a tad warmer and maybe get outside an extra half hour early for good measure. The closet idea looks like a great tip too. Wondering if I should hijack a cup of my wife’s silica gel she uses to dry flowers to keep in the bag.

Joseph F Jasper
Joseph F Jasper
3 months ago

Thanks. Don’t forget dew heaters. They are especially helpful for astrophotography. I have one but often resort to handwarmers and wrap a sheet of bubble wrap around the lens. Another option is shooting from a blind or tent that is heated.

Bob
Bob
3 months ago

I use a uv filter with a rainx treatment on the filter. I got the idea from using it on my bike visor. I normally don’t use a uv filter and would never put rainx directly on my lens but it has never affected any of my UV filters.

charles young
charles young
3 months ago

Great tips and not an issue that I was focusing on but as I’m heading to Pantanal later in the year, I know this will be very useful. AC in jungle may be refreshing but now I’ll be a lot more careful. I did have some minor issues in Columbia but the travel to shoot sites from the room usually cleared it up. In Pantanal we will be staying on the river so the jaguars will be very close to the hotel and time will be of the essence. Again thanks for your videos, they are really helpful especially for… Read more »

Sue
Sue
3 months ago

I recently moved from Alaska where I was accustomed to ‘cold’ fogging. Now being in ‘the lower 48’ in Kentucky where temps have been in the high 90’s, heat fog has become an issue. This video came at a perfect time! So much has been learned from your ebooks, videos, etc. I am a better photographer because of your instructions!

Tim
Tim
3 months ago

Love this! Every informative for me.

Graham w Bostick
Graham w Bostick
3 months ago

As usual you have given some great information .