Too Close? Unlock The Power Of Wildlife Panos!

Have you ever found yourself too close to your wildlife subject? You go to frame up your critter and discover you’re in way too tight for a useable shot. I know, the opposite problem is far more prevalent, but there are times an animal pops out of nowhere or approaches closer than anticipated – and the next thing you know there’s way too much animal in the viewfinder! This is especially true for prime shooters since there’s no option to zoom.

How can you handle it in the field? Wildlife pano shots! In this video, I’ll cover both how to capture them in the field and how to post-process them back home. Give it a watch – I promise, this technique will come to the rescue one day!

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PS – If you enjoyed this post, I think you’ll REALLY like my e-books and video workshops! Thousands of pages and hours of videos filled with tips, tricks, and techniques – all my best content! Check ’em out – click here (hey, it’s free to look).

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This entry was posted in Photoshop Tricks, Techniques, Using Your Gear, Wildlife.

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AdamSteve RubinJohn McCormickSATYAJIT DASVenkatesh VT Recent comment authors
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Adam
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Thank you for sharing your ideas and skills with us once again. I really like how you used the different blend modes to assist with the alignment of the items. Awesome! As is usually the case, this video is fantastic. Steve, thank you very much for your help.

Steve Rubin
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Steve, great video. I’ve done pano’s on the fly (though not for wildlife) many times where you have to be fast. When I used to shoot weddings, it was one of the images I tried to capture while the couple was up on the pulpit (or equivalent) during the ceremony with their full wedding party. I’d do 6 – 8 shots in about 30 seconds.

Glad you’re doing well since your Covid scare. Stay healthy my friend.

John McCormick
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Yesterday I walked out the front door and found three fawns about 25 feet away. I slowly returned inside to pick up my camera. Unfortunately, I had my 500mm PF lens mounted and could not get all of the triplets into single shot. Fortunately, I had recently watched your video. I took two shots and stitched them together in Lightroom. I panned diagonally, forgetting about the advice to go horizontal or vertical. The stitching still worked well, but left gaps in two corners. The fill option worked wonderfully to fill in those corners (just grass). Thanks Steve!

Venkatesh VT
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Venkatesh VT

Real cool Steve.Thx for the video

Nikhil
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Nikhil

Hello Steve,

Thank you for sharing this technique. I look forward to trying it out soon.

Guido
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Guido

And again, it looks so easy, but the mastery is in the little details that are so well explained. Thanks, and I look forward to the next.

Rick Pearson
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Rick Pearson

Great, practical use Steve. I had never thought of a technique like this one. Thank you for sharing your talents!

SATYAJIT DAS
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SATYAJIT DAS

Hey Steve,

Wonderful video. Love to see your videos and quite happy to see your videos coming back. Any plan on making a review video of the new Nikon MC 105 F2.8 Z ? I got it last week, and I think this is the best prime lens I have used as of now and obviously the best Macro lens yet from Nikon. A lot of people get benefited out of your in depth reviews.